WHY WE WANT YOU TO BE RICH

Why Do You Recommend Starting Your Own Business? Donald’s Response  Oddly enough, I don’t always recommend that people start their own businesses. Some people simply are not entrepreneurs, and I feel it’s bad advice to tell everyone that they, too, can be wildly successful when in fact it’s probably not in the cards for them. This doesn’t go over so well with the groups who ask me to speak on motivation and success, but I have to be honest. I don’t ever want to give the wrong advice if I can possibly help it.  About a year ago at one of my speeches, I realized this when a man in his 60s came up to me and asked me some direct questions about becoming an entrepreneur. I had to tell him that it's not always the best thing to do - there’s risk involved. The thought of advising a man who might lose everything at that stage of his life gave me something to think about beyond the usual sound bites of solid success advice I normally might offer. Every case is different, and I would feel personally responsible if he were to follow my advice and fail. I had a feeling he wasn't a natural entrepreneur, and it wasn’t just because he wasn’t a young guy just starting out. I’m a cautious optimist, but the cautious part comes first.  I have recommended that people start their own businesses when the situation warrants it - I’ve seen their work ethic, their drive, their passions and their tenacity, and I know they’ve got what it takes. Some people think they have it, but they don’t. The people I have advised to go into business for themselves have all succeeded. But I haven’t told every person to do it.  I told a young woman in real estate that she should go into business for herself, and she did - the next day! Kim Mogull has become very successful in New York City with her own real estate company, and she still tells people the story of how she got started. She didn’t spend more than 24 hours getting to it. Another person I knew was in the wrong business for him, which was on Wall Street, and I finally told him he was beginning to look like a loser because he wasn’t very good at it and he was miserable. I asked him what he liked to do and his answer had to do with golf. It took a few years of coaxing, but he finally made the change and has become very successful with his own golf business - and very happy at the same time.  These two examples show that 1) you have to be good at what you’re doing, and 2) you have to have the courage to take the leap and go for it yourself. We all have different timetables, but the inclination has to be there.  One of the first things I tell people is that being an entrepreneur is not a group effort. You have to be willing to go it alone for a certain amount of time - and sometimes for a long time. Robert did not have an overnight success, but he kept at it, learned along the way, and look where he is now. If you have the determination, believe me, it is worth it.  The pride of ownership doesn’t have to be explained. It probably starts with our first bicycle. When something is yours, there’s a built-in loyalty factor to making it work well. In my case, my name is on a lot of things, and my responsibility is to make sure the product represents the highest quality possible. Those are my standards, and I work and live accordingly. It’s an integrity of purpose that is hard to equal unless you have your own business.  I’ve heard people say of certain employees they meet or may have, “They work as if the business were their own.” They work with such singleness of purpose, it’s as if they were the owners. Singleness of purpose is required if you want to have your own business - there are no time limits to your work week, for one thing. It can be 24/7, and ultimately, the responsibility is yours.  I like having that responsibility because I find it empowering. It also gives me energy instead of enervating me. Some people will find this pressure to be less than enjoyable, and if that's the case, I urge them to remain employees.  The rewards of having your own business are certainly there to be seen by all. That doesn't have to be explained. Once you’ve had your own business, it’s hard to go back to working for someone else. It’s just not the same, by any stretch of the imagination. It can be a good incentive for working that much harder to remain the captain of your ship. You can say each and every day, “The buck starts with me - now, here, today!” It’s a great feeling.  Having your own business is like growing a tree - it’s a living organism that goes through seasons and storms and beautiful summer days and winter blizzards, but it keeps on growing and is literally an expression of yourself. That’s one reason I’m so careful with the quality controls of what I do. If something represents you, you want  it to be the best representation you can possibly find or achieve. Then you can even raise the bar on yourself and, believe me, you will never be bored.  That’s another great thing about having your own business. If you are bored, you will have no one to blame but yourself, and that situation won’t last long. Some jobs are boring, and there’s not much you can do but leave them. With your own business, you are in control, which equals more freedom.  Freedom is an interesting word because freedom comes with a price. Most business owners will work many more hours than their employees, but I’ve never heard an entrepreneur say they’d rather be working for someone else! Ever!  We’ve all heard about expressing yourself, especially when it comes to art or the arts. That also applies to business, which I see as an art form as well. There are many things in common, including discipline, technique, perseverance and so forth. But it’s that freedom of expression that makes being a business owner especially great. If I have a vision of what I want to do, I go about making it happen. I don’t have to ask anyone for permission, for one thing. It’s my ball game. Granted, I have to follow the laws of the area, zoning and so forth, but the idea and the power to get it done resides with me. That’s a terrific feeling.  People feel inspired for a reason - inspiration is a motivator. Frustration occurs when their inspiration is not attended to. If you have the inspiration and are able to combine it with diligence and focus, I would advise you to think about owning your own business. The rewards are greater, and the old saying, “You will reap what you sow,” rings true again. And you will be reaping it. A good thing to think about. "You will reap what you sow," rings true again. And you will be reaping it. A good thing to think about.  - Donald}. Trump

 

Why Do You Recommend Starting Your Own Business? Donald’s Response  Oddly enough, I don’t always recommend that people start their own businesses. Some people simply are not entrepreneurs, and I feel it’s bad advice to tell everyone that they, too, can be wildly successful when in fact it’s probably not in the cards for them. This doesn’t go over so well with the groups who ask me to speak on motivation and success, but I have to be honest. I don’t ever want to give the wrong advice if I can possibly help it.  About a year ago at one of my speeches, I realized this when a man in his 60s came up to me and asked me some direct questions about becoming an entrepreneur. I had to tell him that it's not always the best thing to do - there’s risk involved. The thought of advising a man who might lose everything at that stage of his life gave me something to think about beyond the usual sound bites of solid success advice I normally might offer. Every case is different, and I would feel personally responsible if he were to follow my advice and fail. I had a feeling he wasn't a natural entrepreneur, and it wasn’t just because he wasn’t a young guy just starting out. I’m a cautious optimist, but the cautious part comes first.  I have recommended that people start their own businesses when the situation warrants it - I’ve seen their work ethic, their drive, their passions and their tenacity, and I know they’ve got what it takes. Some people think they have it, but they don’t. The people I have advised to go into business for themselves have all succeeded. But I haven’t told every person to do it.  I told a young woman in real estate that she should go into business for herself, and she did - the next day! Kim Mogull has become very successful in New York City with her own real estate company, and she still tells people the story of how she got started. She didn’t spend more than 24 hours getting to it. Another person I knew was in the wrong business for him, which was on Wall Street, and I finally told him he was beginning to look like a loser because he wasn’t very good at it and he was miserable. I asked him what he liked to do and his answer had to do with golf. It took a few years of coaxing, but he finally made the change and has become very successful with his own golf business - and very happy at the same time.  These two examples show that 1) you have to be good at what you’re doing, and 2) you have to have the courage to take the leap and go for it yourself. We all have different timetables, but the inclination has to be there.  One of the first things I tell people is that being an entrepreneur is not a group effort. You have to be willing to go it alone for a certain amount of time - and sometimes for a long time. Robert did not have an overnight success, but he kept at it, learned along the way, and look where he is now. If you have the determination, believe me, it is worth it.  The pride of ownership doesn’t have to be explained. It probably starts with our first bicycle. When something is yours, there’s a built-in loyalty factor to making it work well. In my case, my name is on a lot of things, and my responsibility is to make sure the product represents the highest quality possible. Those are my standards, and I work and live accordingly. It’s an integrity of purpose that is hard to equal unless you have your own business.  I’ve heard people say of certain employees they meet or may have, “They work as if the business were their own.” They work with such singleness of purpose, it’s as if they were the owners. Singleness of purpose is required if you want to have your own business - there are no time limits to your work week, for one thing. It can be 24/7, and ultimately, the responsibility is yours.  I like having that responsibility because I find it empowering. It also gives me energy instead of enervating me. Some people will find this pressure to be less than enjoyable, and if that's the case, I urge them to remain employees.  The rewards of having your own business are certainly there to be seen by all. That doesn't have to be explained. Once you’ve had your own business, it’s hard to go back to working for someone else. It’s just not the same, by any stretch of the imagination. It can be a good incentive for working that much harder to remain the captain of your ship. You can say each and every day, “The buck starts with me - now, here, today!” It’s a great feeling.  Having your own business is like growing a tree - it’s a living organism that goes through seasons and storms and beautiful summer days and winter blizzards, but it keeps on growing and is literally an expression of yourself. That’s one reason I’m so careful with the quality controls of what I do. If something represents you, you want  it to be the best representation you can possibly find or achieve. Then you can even raise the bar on yourself and, believe me, you will never be bored.  That’s another great thing about having your own business. If you are bored, you will have no one to blame but yourself, and that situation won’t last long. Some jobs are boring, and there’s not much you can do but leave them. With your own business, you are in control, which equals more freedom.  Freedom is an interesting word because freedom comes with a price. Most business owners will work many more hours than their employees, but I’ve never heard an entrepreneur say they’d rather be working for someone else! Ever!  We’ve all heard about expressing yourself, especially when it comes to art or the arts. That also applies to business, which I see as an art form as well. There are many things in common, including discipline, technique, perseverance and so forth. But it’s that freedom of expression that makes being a business owner especially great. If I have a vision of what I want to do, I go about making it happen. I don’t have to ask anyone for permission, for one thing. It’s my ball game. Granted, I have to follow the laws of the area, zoning and so forth, but the idea and the power to get it done resides with me. That’s a terrific feeling.  People feel inspired for a reason - inspiration is a motivator. Frustration occurs when their inspiration is not attended to. If you have the inspiration and are able to combine it with diligence and focus, I would advise you to think about owning your own business. The rewards are greater, and the old saying, “You will reap what you sow,” rings true again. And you will be reaping it. A good thing to think about. "You will reap what you sow," rings true again. And you will be reaping it. A good thing to think about.  - Donald}. Trump